Whole Grain Tabouleh

This is one of my go-to summer recipes.  It's delicious if you follow the recipe, however, I've made a rendition of this before where I used the recipe as a guideline and threw in whatever I had and it was even better.  Let your creativity and taste buds take the lead!  This recipe comes from Simply in Season.

  • 1 cup uncooked bulgar, quinoa, or couscous
  • 1/4 cup green onions or onion, chopped
  • 2 tomatoes, chopped
  • 1/2 cup fresh cilantro, parsley, or mint
  • 1 cup fresh veggies: cucumbers, green or red sweet peppers, hot peppers, carrots, summer squash, diced
  • 1 cup cooked chickpeas (optional)
  • basil, chopped (optional)
  • 2 T. lemon juice
  • 2 T. olive oil
  • salt and pepper
  1. Prepare grain, fluff lightly with a fork and cool.
  2. Add veggies & chickpeas in with cooled grains.
  3. Mix lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper, and pour over salad.  
  4. Toss gently.

Roasted Summer Vegetables

Another recipe from the book Simply In Season.  What I love about this cookbook is the fact that it encourages you to adapt a recipe with what you have in your fridge and what is in season. With this recipe the authors encourage you to try a variety of veggies, including summer squash, onions, tomatoes, beans, peppers, carrots, fennel, and the list goes on!

  • 8-10 cups fresh veggies: cut into bite-size pieces for even cooking time.  When doing this think about what cooks fast and what takes longer, so big chunks of zucchini and thin slices of potatoes.  Toss with one of the seasoning options below.  Then spread seasoned veggies in a thin layer on a baking sheet and bake in preheated oven at 425F for 20 minutes.  Stir occasionally.

For a main dish: Serve over cooked penne pasta, wild rice, or couscous and top with Parmesan cheese

For a salad:  Cool veggies and add 2 cups diced tomatoes, feta cheese, and additional vinaigrette dressing

Seasoning 1:

  • 3 T. fresh basil, chopped
  • 2 T. fresh cilantro, chopped
  • 1 1/2 T fresh thyme, chopped
  • 1 T. olive oil
  • 1/2 t. salt
  • 1/2 t. pepper
  • 1-4 garlic cloves, minced

Seasoning 2:

  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
  • 2 T. each of fresh thyme, oregano, basil (or some mixture), chopped
  • 2 T. balsamic vinegar
  • 1 T. Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 t. salt
  • 1/4 t. pepper

Coleslaw with Fennel

Fennel is a vegetable people either adore or have no idea what to do with it.  It can be eaten raw or cooked and has an anise flavor.  This is a simple recipe from Simply In Season.

  • 1/4 large head cabbage, shredded
  • 1 bulb fennel, cut in quarters, cored, and thinly sliced
  • 2 carrots, shredded
  • 1/4 onion, thinly sliced

Toss together in a large bowl.

  • 1/4 cup mayo
  • 1 1/2 T. apple cider vinegar
  • 1 1/2 T. honey
  • 1 T. fresh parsley, chopped
  • 1/2 T. Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 t. fennel seeds (optional)

Whisk together in a small bowl.  Pour dressing over vegetables.  Toss until well coated. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Cool Soba Noodles with Bok Choy and Scallions

During these hot days I try my best to make food that doesn't involve too much cooking on a stove as to keep from increasing the temperature in the house.  Here is a good recipe to do just that.  It's also a very flexible recipe that could include many other CSA veggies like thinly sliced radishes!  This recipe was found on The Kitchn.  

  • 1 carrot, peeled and cut into thin matchsticks
  • 2 bunches bok choy, sliced into ribbons
  • 1/2 pound dried soba noodles
  • 6 scallions, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cucumber, peeled and cut into matchsticks
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon hot sauce (optional)
  • 2-4 eggs (optional)

Fill a medium-sized sauce pan with water and bring it to a boil. Drop the carrots and one tablespoon of salt into the boiling water. Blanch the carrots for 30-60 seconds (depending on how cooked you like them) and then lift them out with a slotted spoon or small strainer. Run the carrots under cold water to stop the cooking and then empty them into a medium-sized bowl.

Let the water come back to a boil and add the bok choy. Blanch for 30 seconds and then remove using a slotted spoon or small strainer. Run them under cool water and then add them to the carrots.

Let the water come to a boil again and cook the soba noodles according to package instructions (usually 5-8 minutes, until al dente). Strain the noodles, cool them down, and add them to the bowl with the carrots and bok choy. Add the scallions and cucumbers to the bowl and toss everything gently together.

Whisk together the sesame oil, rice vinegar, soy sauce, and hot sauce (if using). Pour this over the noodles and vegetables, and then toss until everything is evenly coated.

If cooking eggs, empty all but 4 inches of the water and let it come back to a gentle simmer. Crack the eggs into individual measuring cups. Add a splash of white vinegar to the water and slip the cracked eggs in one at a time. Poach for 4 minutes for soft boiled eggs or 5 minutes for a firmer yolk. Strain and set aside until serving. (Here's a full video on how to do this)

Divide salad into individual bowls and add a poached egg to each bowl. Salad can be served warm or cold, and it can keep refrigerated for about 3 days.

Day Before CSA Pick Up Stir-fry

It's the day before CSA pick up and you look in your fridge and realize you still have a smattering of produce from last week (any maybe even a bok choy from two weeks ago).  This is a good time to whip together a spontaneous, no-recipe-needed, fridge-cleanin' stir fry!  Since I said there is no need for a recipe, let me just give you a few guidelines I like to follow when making a stir fry.  

First off, just about any vegetable can be thrown into a stir fry and either taste delicious or be hidden amongst the deliciousness that is this dish.  Radishes, kohlrabi, cabbage, no problem!  

Secondly, I like to have something in the onion family, a few roots, and some leaves.  It's all the better if you've got some tasty cilantro or parsley hanging around.  You can add the vegetable mix to either noodles, rice, or some other grain.  There are many kinds of sauce you can make and add in and I've added a couple of types towards the bottom of this page.

  • Take a wok or large frying pan out and add a slosh of olive oil and set at medium heat.  
  • Add onion family first (scallions, onion, garlic, leeks, garlic scapes) and let sizzle.  Cook for a bit until the onions/scallions/leeks are translucent or start to soften.
  • Then add any root-ish veggies (radishes, kohlrabi, beets, carrots, turnips) that you sliced up all cute and cook for a bit until they feel tender.
  • Stems!  If you've got some bok choy, chard, or beets throw those stems in before the greens so they cook down a bit.  These only take 3-5 minutes to cook.  Don't use kale stems!  They will make your dish no bueno.
  • Follow with some leafy greens.  This could be bok choy, chard, kale, collards, turnip greens, radish greens, or some salad mix.  If I use salad mix, I like to add it right at the end and just have it wilt a teensy bit.  Cook all other greens until they brighten up and wilt.
  • Remove from heat and add sauce.  Mix around.  Serve over rice, noodles, or your choice of grain.

Peanut Sauce

  • 1/2 cup natural peanut butter (we prefer chunky)
  • 1 T. honey
  • 1/4 cup water
  • If using salted peanut butter no salt is needed.  If unsalted, add 1 t. salt.
  • 1-2 T. lemon juice
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • red pepper flakes to spice things up, if you're into that kinda thing

Put ingredients into a bowl and whisk until smooth.

Soy Sauce Sauce

  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 T. rice vinegar
  • 1 t. sesame oil (I've omitted that and used olive oil instead)
  • pinch of hot pepper flakes
  • 1 t. grated ginger
  • a touch of honey

Put ingredients into a bowl and whisk until smooth.

 

 

Spinach & Cilantro & Frozen Pea Soup

Last week we threw A TON of spinach your way.  Here is a nice way to eat it up.  This soup is a favorite of mine.  It feels healthy & bright.  Originally from the Moosewood Cooking for Health cookbook.

  • 2 T. olive oil
  • 1 1/2 cups chopped onion (or use up whatever scallions are in your fridge)
  • 2 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1/2 t. salt
  • 1 cup chopped carrots
  • 1 T. curry powder of any kind
  • 1/2 t. ground turmeric
  • 1 quart vegetable broth
  • 2 cups fresh or frozen peas (I've only made it with frozen peas)
  • 3 cups fresh spinach!
  • 1/3 cup fresh cilantro
  • dash of pepper

In soup pot on medium-high heat, add oil and warm.  Throw in onion, garlic, salt, and cook until the onions and garlic soften a bit.  Then add carrots and cook for a little longer.  Add in curry and turmeric and stir.  Then, put in broth, 1 cup of your peas, and cover and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat and simmer until the carrots are soft.  

Take off heat and add spinach and cilantro.  Blend the soup, in batches, until smooth.  Combine the rest of the peas and keep those whole.  Check if it needs some salt or pepper and add in if needed.  Return to heat until warm and ready to be eaten.